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How To Subscribe to the LTD RSS Feed in Chrome

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What is RSS?

Rich Site Summary (RSS) is a web standard that allows users to subscribe to a feed of content from a web site. By subscribing to the LTD article feed, you will always have access to the most recent articles through the feed reader in your browser.


14 Things You Didn't Know About Valentine's Day | The Lakeside Collection

14 Things You Didn't
Know About Valentine's Day

Valentine's Day might not be one of our favorite holidays in America, but it's definitely one of the most popular. Highly anticipated by some. Dreaded by others. Cards. Chocolate. Flowers. Cupid and candy hearts. We all know how Valentine's Day goes. At different points in our lives, we've all been on both sides of the fence regarding our enthusiasm for this day of affection. But like many of the holidays that mark our calendars year in and year out, there are plenty of things we don't know or haven't even questioned about Valentine's Day. Learn some facts about the holiday's Roman and medieval history, as well as intriguing stats about roses, chocolate, movies, and more.


1 There Were Three
Saint Valentines

The most popular story about Saint Valentine is little more than legend. Little is known about him other than the fact that he was a Roman priest. As the story goes, he married young couples, directly violating an edict by Emperor Claudius II that discouraged young men (who would have been soldiers in the Roman legions) from marrying at a young age to keep them focused on their duty to the Empire. Valentine was executed for his violation of the edict in the 3rd century on the 14th of February. Strangely, there are two other Christian martyrs named Valentine that are said to have met their demise on the same date, though not as much is known about them.


2 It Began As A Catholic
Feast Day In 496 A.D.

Like many holidays, several events mixed together over the course of history to make Valentine's Day possible. While Saint Valentine's martyrdom is regarded as the legend with the strongest tie to the holiday's origin, the pagan Roman festival, Lupercalia, was just as important. Lupercalia was an ancient fertility festival involving animal sacrifices, the god Faunus, and a huge feast. This pagan celebration was appropriated into the Christian canon by Pope Gelasius I in the year 496, establishing the 14th of February as its official date, likely as a tribute to Saint Valentine's sacrifice.

3"Heart On Your Sleeve"
Is From The Middle Ages

Claudius II's edict may have declared marriage illegal, but it's known that he didn't completely discourage relationships. At an annual Roman festival, men were allowed to pick the names of women they intended to pursue, and if successful, would wear the woman's name on their sleeve throughout the festival. In the same fashion, it was common for knights participating in jousting matches in the Middle Ages to pledge themselves to the women they loved by adding tokens from the ladies on their arms, such as handkerchiefs, or by wearing the colors of the women's families in place of their own. However, the most famous usage of the phrase comes from William Shakespeare's play, Othello.


4 X's And O's Didn't
Always Mean Kisses And Hugs

While emojis have all but eliminated symbols like the famous XOXO from the vocabularies of people in younger generations, X's and O's have an interesting history that dates back to ancient societies. We can only speculate as to how these markings came to symbolize kisses and hugs, but one interesting theory notes an evolution from religious symbol to practical tool. In the early centuries of the 1st millennium, the X became a common symbol among Christians to represent their faith. In a world where the ability to write was a privileged skill, many people adopted the X as an easy way to sign their name. The meaning of these symbols, perhaps because of their use in the signature lines of letters for many centuries, slowly transformed into symbols of affection.


5 Weird Foods Were Eaten To Inspire Visions Of Future Love

In the Middle Ages, it became a common Valentine's Day tradition that women would eat strange foods to induce dreams of their future husbands.


  • 6 Chocolate Was Used To Mend Broken Hearts

    For a certain spell in the 1800's, doctors sometimes prescribed chocolate to patients who showed signs of emotional distress caused by a broken heart.

  • 7 Chocolate Sales Usually Total Over
    $1 Billion

    Chocolate still mends broken hearts in its own way, though it is more likely given as a gift. The average Valentine's Day sees over $1 billion in total chocolate sales, which equals over 50 million pounds of chocolate.

  • 8 Valentine's Day Has The Most Proposals

    If people aren't convinced by the prospect of proposing or being proposed to on Valentine's Day, the numbers don't show it. There are over 200,000 Valentine's Day marriage proposals each year.


9 Valentine's Day Isn't The Biggest Holiday For Cards

The biggest holiday of the year for giving cards is actually Christmas, which probably has to do with the fact that most Valentine's Day cards are bought within a week of February 14th.

10 The Highest Grossing Movies On Valentine's
Day Are:

The highest grossing movies on Valentine's Day aren't romantic comedies. Deadpool (2016) holds the record for the highest grossing movie on the weekend closest to the holiday, while Daredevil (2003) is the highest grossing to actually open on February 14th.


11 China's Version of Valentine's Day Is The Magpie Festival

Unlike Christmas, Valentine's Day isn't widely celebrated around the world. It was even removed from the Roman Catholic Calendar of Saints in 1969. However, there are a variety of equivalent holidays around the world with a similar theme. In China, the Double Seventh Festival, a.k.a. the Qixi Festival or the Magpie Festival, is celebrated in August. It shares most of the gift-giving, rose-filled, chocolate-buying traits for which Valentine's Day is known. The legend behind the holiday is very romantic, and might be the reason why so many movies use bridges as a romantic meeting place.


12 200 Million Roses Are Produced Annually

Around 200 million roses are grown each year to meet the Valentine's Day demand. And of those millions of flowers, nearly 75 percent of them are purchased by men. About as many single stems are sold as greeting cards are bought, although women traditionally do most of the card buying, having over an 80 percent stake in the total business. Interestingly, of all the money that is spent on Valentine's Day, flowers rank as far as fourth on the list after candy, cards and dining. Other than roses, the top flowers sold on Valentine's Day tend to be lilies, carnations and tulips.

13 Aphrodite Is The Reason For Roses

Ancient Greek and Roman mythology is packed with references to the rose, which also appears frequently in many ancient stories from legendary Eastern traditions to Egyptian lore. According to mythology, Aphrodite (the Goddess of Love) created the rose from her own tears. The Romans expanded on the Greek narrative. Aphrodite became Venus, and her son, Cupid, has since been linked directly to the Valentine's Day tradition. In one of the more interesting stories, it was Cupid who gave roses their thorns, "stinging" them by accidentally shooting an arrow into the garden.


14 Roses Aren't The Only Flowers With A
Special Meaning

Roses are by far the most popular flowers exchanged on Valentine's Day, but there are a variety of flowers that symbolize things perfectly suitable for expressing the feelings you may want to divulge on this particular Valentine's Day. Everything down to the color of roses you buy might symbolize something, so it's better to know the subtle differences if you aren't sure. For example, yellow or coral roses are generally regarded as expressing friendship or platonic relationships, whereas lavender, orange and red (especially dark red) symbolize romantic love and passion. If you?re wondering what flowers other than roses symbolize, check out this comprehensive guide.


Take a break from the traditional flowers or chocolates and find Valentine's Day gifts for him, her or whomever with the many possibilities available right now at The Lakeside Collection.


 
 

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How To Subscribe to the LTD RSS Feed in Chrome

Your Chrome browser requires you to install an RSS Reader first. If you have a reader installed already and wish to subscribe, please click the "Continue" button below.

If you do not already have a reader installed, please click the "Cancel" button to close this modal. Then, you will need to find and install an RSS Reader for your Chrome browser before you can subscribe. You can find an RSS reader for the Chrome browser by searching the Chrome Web Store.

What is RSS?

Rich Site Summary (RSS) is a web standard that allows users to subscribe to a feed of content from a web site. By subscribing to the LTD article feed, you will always have access to the most recent articles through the feed reader in your browser.

How to Subscribe to the RSS feed on a mobile device or tablet

Most mobile browsers do not support RSS. However, if your browser does support RSS and you wish to subscribe, please click the "Continue" button.

Otherwise, click the "Cancel" button and choose one of these options:

  • You may subscribe by using an RSS Reader app. Please install an app and follow the directions to subscribe to this page.
  • iOS devices may also subscribe through Bookmarks in your Safari browser
    • Tap on the Bookmarks icon in your Safari browser
    • Tap on @ at the Shared Links tab
    • Tap on Subscriptions
    • Tap on Add Current Site
    • Tap on done

What is RSS?

Rich Site Summary (RSS) is a web standard that allows users to subscribe to a feed of content from a web site. By subscribing to the LTD article feed, you will always have access to the most recent articles through the feed reader in your browser.


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