×

How To Subscribe to the LTD RSS Feed in Chrome

Your Chrome browser requires you to install an RSS Reader first. If you have a reader installed already and wish to subscribe, please click the "Continue" button below.

If you do not already have a reader installed, please click the "Cancel" button to close this modal. Then, you will need to find and install an RSS Reader for your Chrome browser before you can subscribe. You can find an RSS reader for the Chrome browser by searching the Chrome Web Store.

What is RSS?

Rich Site Summary (RSS) is a web standard that allows users to subscribe to a feed of content from a web site. By subscribing to the LTD article feed, you will always have access to the most recent articles through the feed reader in your browser.

How to Subscribe to the RSS feed on a mobile device or tablet

Most mobile browsers do not support RSS. However, if your browser does support RSS and you wish to subscribe, please click the "Continue" button.

Otherwise, click the "Cancel" button and choose one of these options:

  • You may subscribe by using an RSS Reader app. Please install an app and follow the directions to subscribe to this page.
  • iOS devices may also subscribe through Bookmarks in your Safari browser
    • Tap on the Bookmarks icon in your Safari browser
    • Tap on @ at the Shared Links tab
    • Tap on Subscriptions
    • Tap on Add Current Site
    • Tap on done

What is RSS?

Rich Site Summary (RSS) is a web standard that allows users to subscribe to a feed of content from a web site. By subscribing to the LTD article feed, you will always have access to the most recent articles through the feed reader in your browser.


Easter Dinner: The Origins Of Our Traditional Dinner | The Lakeside Collection

Easter Dinner: The Origins
Of Our Traditional Dinner

Dinner tabletop.

Easter is almost here! It's time to pull out your trusty cookbooks and look up your family's favorite recipes for Easter dinner. Did you ever wonder why we eat the foods we do on Easter? Everybody knows the story of the Pilgrims and the Indians and why we eat turkey on Thanksgiving. But what are the origins of the traditional Easter dinner?


Is It Ham, Or Lamb?

Thanksgiving has its turkey and Easter has ham--or is it lamb? Depends on where you live. For most Americans, it's ham. Historically, this was a matter of availability. In the days before refrigeration, it made sense to get meat in the fall, when the cool temperatures would help keep it from going bad after the butchering was done. The pork that wasn't eaten immediately was salted and cured for eating later. The curing process took all winter, and the first hams were ready to eat right around Easter. It wasn't long before ham for Easter was part of the American tradition.

In other parts of the world, especially Europe, lamb is commonly served on Easter. The symbolism here is obvious. Jesus is referred to as the "Lamb of God" in Christian liturgies. Also, in ancient times, lamb was one of the first fresh meats available after the long winter. Check out this website, which offers recipes for both ham and lamb, along with historical notes.


Easter deviled eggs.

Wouldn't Be Easter Without Eggs

Eggs usually show up on the table as deviled eggs, although colored hard-boiled eggs are not unheard of as dinner fare. The egg has been a symbol of rebirth or new life since pagan times. Early Christians adopted this symbolism and added the idea that the hard shell represented the tomb of Jesus and the breaking of the shell was His emergence from the tomb. Christians in Mesopotamia are said to be the first to color eggs, turning them bright red in memory of Christ's blood. In the 13th century, King Edward I of England had 450 eggs colored and decorated with gold leaf to give as Easter gifts to his court.

Hot crossed buns.

One A Penny, Two A Penny, Hot Cross Buns

This bread accompaniment to the Easter dinner is another element borrowed from the pagans. It probably began as a tribute to Eostre, the Saxon goddess of light, after whom it is said that Easter is named. Even the cross on the bun was not the cross of Jesus but a Celtic symbol representing the intersection of heaven and earth, the divine and the human, which Christians believe also applies to Jesus.


Shop The Lakeside Collection for your holiday needs all year long. We offer 4th of July tableware, Halloween decorations and Easter basket stuffers. And our incredible prices will make you smile.


 
 

×

How To Subscribe to the LTD RSS Feed in Chrome

Your Chrome browser requires you to install an RSS Reader first. If you have a reader installed already and wish to subscribe, please click the "Continue" button below.

If you do not already have a reader installed, please click the "Cancel" button to close this modal. Then, you will need to find and install an RSS Reader for your Chrome browser before you can subscribe. You can find an RSS reader for the Chrome browser by searching the Chrome Web Store.

What is RSS?

Rich Site Summary (RSS) is a web standard that allows users to subscribe to a feed of content from a web site. By subscribing to the LTD article feed, you will always have access to the most recent articles through the feed reader in your browser.

How to Subscribe to the RSS feed on a mobile device or tablet

Most mobile browsers do not support RSS. However, if your browser does support RSS and you wish to subscribe, please click the "Continue" button.

Otherwise, click the "Cancel" button and choose one of these options:

  • You may subscribe by using an RSS Reader app. Please install an app and follow the directions to subscribe to this page.
  • iOS devices may also subscribe through Bookmarks in your Safari browser
    • Tap on the Bookmarks icon in your Safari browser
    • Tap on @ at the Shared Links tab
    • Tap on Subscriptions
    • Tap on Add Current Site
    • Tap on done

What is RSS?

Rich Site Summary (RSS) is a web standard that allows users to subscribe to a feed of content from a web site. By subscribing to the LTD article feed, you will always have access to the most recent articles through the feed reader in your browser.


More Ideas For You

×
×